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Welcome to “How To Swim Faster in 30 Days: A Freestyle Guide to Dropping Time.”  Our goal with this program is to help you become faster, stronger and a more efficient swimmer than ever before!  It’s no secret that swimming is a technique-intensive sport. Whether your goal is to develop a healthy, injury-free fitness routine or perform faster in races, good form is a fundamental prerequisite.

Swim technique sets the limit on where your fitness will take you.  If you are stuck at the same speed, focusing on your technique can give you some FREE speed. FREE speed is when you swim faster with less effort.

Frequency and consistency is your quickest path to success in swimming. The only time you use your swimming muscles and breathing style is in the water.  Swimming is a “Feel” a term that basically describes how quickly and much water you can grab, hold and push back with each stroke, obviously the more the better! It’s tough to develop feel by swimming once. As a beginner the more time you are in the water, the more comfortable you will become and quicker you will develop the skills to be efficient. If you’re new to swimming and want to improve quickly, or if you’ve plateaued and haven’t seen a best time for a long time, swimming with a purpose and frequency is the best way to get your there.

Trying to swim further and faster at the expense of time spent working on your technique will hurt more than it helps! I often tell athletes they have to slow down to get faster in the water. Relaxing, slow down, find a drill that will help you with your technique limiter, practice it perfectly and include in all your workouts.Identify your weaknesses then execute a plan to turn them into strengths.

Video is a phenomenal and effective tool when is comes to showing  swimmers what they’re doing right and what they’re doing wrong. That’s why I encourage all of my athletes to record and send me footage for analysis.  (Free Swim Form Analysis Signup Here)

Since a majority of my coaching business is online, video has become a huge advantage in my instruction.  Adding video has helped me deliver more value for my athletes and is often the point of difference between me and my services over other online coaches.

In this step-by-step swimming program, you’ll find more than 2 hours of video instruction and demonstrations explaining, performing and teaching proper swim technique and fundamentals.  In addition to coaching on deck, I personally perform examples of all my drills.

You’ll find my detailed “How To Swim Faster in 30 Days” training calendar at the end of this document.   I reference many of the drills and exercises you’re about to learn about within that program. So please take the time to first read through my entire course and watch each video before starting your 30 day workout schedule.   Rest assured. If you follow this guide, you will get faster in the water!

Let’s kick things off HERE as I explain the “Keys to Proper Swim Technique” (3:29)

BREATHING

The first step is evaluating how to breath.  A swimmer must be comfortable breathing before they can focus on body balance, which is needed before they learn swim mechanics.  If they work on mechanics before they are breathing efficiently, they will be frustrated. If they can breathe, we move on to step 2 (balance and kick).

Click HERE to watch me demonstrate and talk about Breathing (2:04)

 

Your head should NOT lift when you breathe. As you rotate on your hip for an inhalation your head should remain in line with your spine-hips-and-feet. Your whole body should be parallel to the surface of the water. If your head lifts it suggests your hips have dropped, or your head lift will create them to drop too deep beneath the surface. If you have to raise your head higher to get the air in you are taking too long to inhale and legs will sink. Keep your head low to the surface of the water as you breathe. One ear and one eye should remain underneath the water at all times!

 

Even if the swimmer is comfortable breathing, I still go over the 4 things that cause breathlessness just in case they encounter breathing issues during training.  The 4 things that cause breathlessness are:

1) Not exhaling immediately before they inhale

2) Lower body dragging

3) Kicking too much

4) Dropping their extended arm while turning to inhale

If someone is having breathing issues, they typically cannot swim more than 1-1.5 lengths before they are breathless.  I suggest using a kickboard and practice inhaling with your face above water and exhaling underwater. The key to breathing is a forceful exhale before inhale.

 

Click HERE to watch me demonstrate and explain Good Breathing vs. Bad (2:57)

Click HERE to watch me demonstrate and explain Breathing Too Frequently (2:45)

BODY BALANCE & ROTATION

When you swim, you are either on your right or left hip. When you rotate from hip to hip, your shoulder is in line with your hip. Some swimmers are taught shoulder rotation.  I teach hip rotation, then your shoulder follows. If you are a one side dominate breather you are typically always on one hip. For example, a right side dominate breather tends to be on their left hip and doesn’t know that they should complete the rotation cycle on their right hip too, even if they don’t breath to the left.

 

Below, I speak about and show examples of body balance and rotation:

1) Body Balance Demo (2:08)

2) Rotation Demo (1:27)

3) Balance Drill with Rotation (2:27)

4) Balance Drill Performed Incorrectly (2:10)

5) Balance Drill with One Arm Out Front (2:47)

6) Balance Drill Double Pump (2:59)

 

BONUS VIDEOS: Masters Swimming Class Breakout Session – All About Balance

Balance Drill (Watch Video Here) (3:57)

Balance Drill Plus Three  (Watch Video Here) (4:01)

Side Kicking  (Watch Video Here) (2:26)

6 Kick, 3 Pull   (Watch Video Here)  (2:02)

 

Bilateral breathing helps with hip rotation. I’ll talk more about bilateral breathing in a moment.  Knowing that you should rotate on your hip to breath, helps with getting comfortable breathing to the non-dominate side.  A common problem with most newbie swimmers is poor body position, which can lead to legs sinking.

Click  HERE to watch me demonstrate and explain Low Legs in the water (2:07)

We discuss pressing the weight of their body on their sternum and tucking their chin. This brings their legs closer to the surface and produces a “downhill” swimming sensation.  Also hand entry will help with body weight distribution.

Kick on side drill: This kick is done without a board, and fins are encouraged. Start lying on your right side with your right arm extended above your head and your left arm at your side. Kick about six times; then initiate a stroke with the right arm and rotate to the other side.

With this drill, you are effectively freezing your body position after each stroke – one arm in extended entry position, the other arm in extended follow-through position while continuing to kick. As you take a stroke to rotate to the other side, focus on gradually accelerating from the beginning to the end of that stroke. Finish with a nice snap of the hips as you roll the body to the side.

Another common theme among newbie swimmers is not rotating on the hip or side they don’t breathe on. Most often, they are right-side-dominant breathers. They consistently rotate on one side to breathe and never fully rotate on the non-dominant side. This is when I emphasis the importance of bilateral breathing; breathing on both left and right hips, and the value that provides with proper body balance and rotation. Basically, when your left fingertips enter the water, rotate on your left hip, when your right fingertips enter the water, rotate on your right hip, whether you are breathing on that stroke or not.

KICKING

Breathing, body position and rotation is critical to swimming performance. While more of the drills I incorporate into swim technique teach you to pull yourself through the water, your legs do more for your stroke than just provide propulsion; they help get your body into balance  position and provide the stability to keep you there! Ignoring your legs results in poor positioning, increased resistance, more energy expenditure and slower swim times. Working on ankle flexibility and kicking from your quad and hip flexors will help with balance.

Kick goes with balance.  When swimming, the legs and torso should be balanced during rotation. Swimmers who are not balanced during rotation may compensate for this issue by scissoring their legs to provide balance.

Personally, I’m not much of a kicker. I propel myself through the water with my lats (back).  When I was “just a swimmer” I did use my legs for propulsion. The most common kick rhythms are 2, 4 and 6  beat kick. The number of kicks per full arm cycle. A full arm cycle is the time it takes for one arm to move full circle from a starting point to it’s finish point. You count a kick each time your leg drives downwards – One downward drive of the foot equals one kick. So, for a 2 beat kick you’ll drive your feet downwards twice (one left one right) while your arms move through one full cycle.

For a 6 beat kick you will drive your feet down 6 times (3 left 3 right while your arms move through one full stroke cycle – it’s fast! This is not recommended for a triathlete and you don’t kick while wearing a wetsuit so learning to pull and strengthen your upper body will provide a 2 bet kick.  Kicking too hard will increase your heart rate and your breathing which means you’ll become fatigued sooner.

Proper kick for triathletes stems from the hip.  Engaging quads and hip flexors, relaxing the lower leg beyond the kick. Flexible ankles help.  

Click  HERE to watch me demonstrate and explain Kicking (2:31)

Click  HERE to watch me demonstrate and explain Scissor Kick vs Proper Kick (3:32)

 

BILATERAL BREATHING

Do you have a breathing pattern?  Sometimes when I am teaching adults “how to swim”or stroke technique they tell me they thought a certain breathing pattern, typically every 2 strokes (left/right arm), or bilateral, every 3rd stroke, was the default breathing pattern.

Efficient breathing patterns vary. There is no right way, only the best way for you. You have to be able to breath before you can work on mechanics of your stroke. If you are struggling with breathing to the dominate side, it does not make sense to incorporate breathing to the non dominate side (bilateral breathing) until you are comfortable breathing to the dominate side.

Click  HERE to watch me demonstrate and explain Bilateral Breathing (3:08)

This is why bilateral is often the “best” answer.  One issue with breathing to one side only is creating an imbalance.  Your non-dominate breathing arm is weaker and you tend to rotate to one hip only. When you are a dominant right side breather, you tend to swim on your left hip because you are most comfortable breathing right. Your non-dominate side/arm tends to pull wide, or “fall” too soon while your face is out of the water to catch a breath.  If you only breath to one side, you’re not able to exhale and inhale efficiently and that can lead to breathlessness.

If you have been practicing and training in the water and still struggling with breathing follow these steps a few times to see what works best for you:

 

  • Assess, be mindful, how you innate and exhale to get a baseline starting point, to understand what you are doing
  • Inhale through your lungs, not your month
  • Do not exhale immediately after you inhale. Blow a little bit out your mouth and nose until you need a breath, then take a quick forceful exhale before you inhale
  • Hold your breath after you inhale and only exhale as your turn your head to inhale. Holding your breath often creates a desire and/or need to exhale before you inhale.  Take 2, 4, 6 or as many strokes and you can to see what your optimal stroke count is before you need a breath.

Once you get comfortable breathing to the dominate side, practice the same techniques breathing to the non-dominate side only. Once you get some comfortable breathing to the non-dominate side start to incorporate bilateral breathing every 3rd or 5th stroke. If you are not comfortable breathing to the non-dominate side then aim for a pattern of 4-6 strokes and be mindful of hip rotation and underwater pull.  Remember, the best breathing rhythm will vary from swimmer to swimmer. Practice the above techniques and patterns to see how you can get a good breath.

Next up, we’ll talk about and demonstrate the three phases of the swim stroke

THREE PHASES OF THE SWIM STROKE

Once breathing, body balance and rotation are fine-tuned, I focus on the mechanics of the freestyle art form. There are three main phases of the stroke:

1) Recovery

2) Hand Entry

3) Underwater Catch/Push

I often see swimmers recovering with straight arms and entering the water with their palm and elbow at the same time; creating a straight-armed pull with no high-elbow catch. In the end, high-elbow recovery sets them up for a nice fingertip-angled entry when they rotate which in turn, sets up a high-elbow catch and pull.

PHASE 1: RECOVERY

The recovery phase is the term used to describe what your arm is doing out of water.  How your arm recovers naturally affects hand entry. What I see often from new swimmers is straight arms and a big REACH in front of them before their fingertip entry. This can cause a lot of stress on your shoulders and cause you to enter the water with your elbow.   I refer to this as dropping your elbow. When I see this with my athletes, I will spend some time helping them bring their arm close to their bodies with fingertip and thumb slide drills to create a high elbow recovery pointed to the ceiling.

High-elbow recovery means leading with your elbow and relaxing the phase of your stroke where your arm exits the water. I frequently remind swimmers to swim with their fingertips below their wrist and below their elbow.  

Click  HERE to watch me demonstrate and explain High Elbow Recovery (3:15)

Here are two keys drills I use to create a high-elbow recovery:

PHASE 2: HAND ENTRY

The recovery phase impacts your entry phase. How the swimmer’s hand enters the water, I believe,  is the most important phase to set the swimmer up for a strong “catch” and “push”; the pull phase of the stroke.

If you keep your fingertips below your wrist, below your elbow during the recovery phase, your recovery arm fingertips will spear into the water as the opposite arm is pulling and driving your hip rotation to extend the recovery arm deeper out in front of you to prevent you from “stopping” yourself. Stopping refers to making a “stop” single with your hand, fingertips pointed up. The STOP Stroke happens when your fingers point upwards towards the surface of the water after entering as they extend. With the fingers up and the palm of your hand facing forward to the oncoming water you are literally putting the STOP sign out, creating resistance and slowing yourself. Make an effort to get your fingers down – if the STOP sign persists, you’re gliding too long!

Most swimmers that learn to swim as an adult are taught to reach as far as they can either before or after entry. This can put a lot of stress on the athlete’s shoulder and often creates igniting the pull with a dropped elbow. Entry phase means an angled, deep hand entry, which can help create a high elbow catch and pull phase. I often demonstrate fist and head-out-of-the-water drills to exaggerate the entry.

 

Click  HERE to watch me demonstrate and explain Hand Entry (3:53)

Includes *fist and *head out of the water drills.

 

Just as the name implies, fist drill is when you close your hands into fists and swim. If you feel like you aren’t getting very far, don’t worry.  The goal is to keep your elbow high during the “pull” phase of the stroke. Let your arm seek out the optimal position that grips the water and provides the most power.   As you can see in the “hand entry” video above, swimming with your head out of the water, increase your arm recovery rate, and focuses on an angled hand entry making sure not to reach and flatten your hand at entry.

Attention to body balance, rotation, high elbow recovery and hand entry will set you up to develop a stronger pull and power phase of the stroke. If you make stroke drills an integral part of your training, you will be rewarded with fewer injuries and faster times.

PHASE 3: CATCH / PULL

Now that you are comfortable with breathing, body balance, rotation, high elbow recovery and hand entry, your underwater pull should be setup to put some power below.

When I was a kid I learned, and then eventually taught swimmers to move their hands in an “S” shape as they completed their pull. After the hand entered here was an emphasis on sweeping in, sweeping out and sweeping in again. I stopped teaching that in 2000 when I started teaching adults. I went from teaching an S to a ? mark and now teach  in order to move forward you have to push the water backwards.

The term “Early Vertical Forearm” or “high elbow” catch is the new way to teach the pull.  Think of your hand as a paddle with your hand, wrist and forearm working together as one bigger “paddle”.⠀Your goal is to get this hand-wrist-forearm “paddle” to push water BACKWARDS (not downwards) as quickly as you can from your deep extended under water position, arm extended deep out in front of you via hip rotation, after your arm enters the water.

When working on your pull, hold your breath, look down and watch your hands pull through the water.  Your hands should not be wider than hips and don’t cross the centerline. If your hand entry is good, then the “catch” proceeds the pull in the correct position and all your strength and power should be put into the push, past your hips, scrapping your thigh with every arm pull.

Click HERE to watch me demonstrate and explain Underwater Pull (2:39)

Click HERE to watch me demonstrate and explain Catch Up Drill Incorrectly (2:46)

Click HERE to watch me demonstrate and explain Catch Up Drill Correctly (2:41)

Click HERE to watch me demonstrate and explain Catch Up Drill Underwater POV (2:26)

Click HERE to watch me demonstrate and explain One Arm Drill Incorrectly (2:02)

 

Here are a few additional video demonstrations I created to help clear up some common swimming mistakes I continue see, some balance do’s and don’ts as well as extended videos illustrating previously discussed drills.

BONUS VIDEOS:  Private Coaching Lessons On Deck with Coach Wendy Mader (50+ minutes total)

Private Coaching Lesson with Ellen (Watch Video Here)   (17:21)

 

Private Coaching Lesson with Traveler  (Watch Video Here)  (19:24)

 

Private Coaching Lesson with Morgan (Watch Video Here)  (7:33)

 

Private Coaching Lesson with Emily (Watch Video Here)  (3:09)

 

Private Coaching Lesson with Dave (Watch Video Here)  (2:29)

 

ADVANCED VIDEO LESSONS:

Why Triathletes Should Learn the Other Strokes (related article)

 

Click HERE to watch me demonstrate and explain the Breast Stroke (3:13)

Click HERE to watch me demonstrate and explain the Backstroke (2:20)

Click HERE to watch me demonstrate and explain the Butterfly Stroke (2:59)

Click HERE to watch me demonstrate and explain the Flip Turns (2:51)

Stroke Rate And Distance Per Stroke

In swimming, speed depends on stroke rate, which is the number of strokes per minute, and distance per stroke, which is the distance the body travels per stroke. To increase speed, do you increase stroke count? One of the key indicators of a great swimmer is the ability to increase speed while maintaining stroke count. Swimming faster doesn’t necessarily mean spinning your arms around faster.  If you can drive more power from your core, get a better catch and pull and stay more streamlined you should be able to speed up without taking more strokes. You simply need to find what’s fastest and most efficient for you. The optimal number varies from person to person!

Learn Your Paces: Setting Your Training Zones

Do you only hit one pace in one gear each time you swim? Have you learned how to find a rhythm and tempo that’s efficient and comfortable and can you hold it through your repeats and sets? Being able to “change gears” at any point in your swim is a big advantage that could allow you to move with a breakaway pack, catch a break away pack, shake off a drafting competitor, or get yourself into someone’s draft for a free ride!

To be competitive and adaptable to any race situation, you need to practice changing gears, altering your intensity, and playing with your speed in training.

How To Use The Pace Clock to track your times and Rest Intervals (RI)

One of the biggest advantages of swimming in a pool (vs open water) is that we have consistent feedback on our pacing via the pace clock.  If your pool has a pace clock up for you to see while you swim, learn how to read it. This will help you manage your paces and intensity.  Learn to use the pace clock and how to read it. The typical pace clock is really very simple to use. It has a minute hand and a second hand and is divided into 5 second increments from 5 – 60 seconds.  The clock will tell you how fast you are swimming, BUT MORE IMPORTANTLY, it should dictate and measure how long you are resting between repeats and sets.  Reduced rest times (along with faster repeat times) are two indicators that you are becoming a better swimmer!

Ok, are you ready to start swimming?!  Your 30 Day Training Calendar is below.  Happy swimming

HOW TO SWIM FASTER IN 30 DAYS TRAINING PLAN

Watch This Video Before You Begin

DAY 1 – SWIM TEST

WU: 200 warm up. 4 x 50 build RI 15″

MS: 500 / 1000 yd or meter TT (time trial) for time.

CD: 200 – This time is divided by 5 or 10 , to get your avg. pace.

This pace is now known as your T-Pace.

WU = warm up

MS = main set

CD = cool down

RI = rest interval

” = seconds

 

DAY 2 – SWIM GOLF

WU: 100- 200 loosen up

MS: wear a pull buoy.

1. Swim 50 count strokes and add to your time, that is your golf score.

Example, 50 strokes in 50 seconds = 100.

2. Then swim 50 with as many strokes as you can, Try to add at least 10 strokes per length. add to your time.

3. Then swim 50 with the least amount of strokes focusing on pulling from behind, past your hip, and add to your time. Record your normal stroke count, FASTEST stroke count, and stroke count when you are trying to take less strokes

MS: pull with buoy

10X50s best average golf score (stroke count and time). Did you lower your stroke count by taking less strokes or swimming faster or both?

CD: 100 easy

DAY 3 – Day Off: Focus on recovery today, nutrition, massage, stretch, yoga, relax.

 

DAY 4 – SWIM SKILLS AND DRILLS

WU: 100 get loose

Drills: Focus on how well you do the drills, not on how fast.

2X50 25 balance drill left side/25 balance drill right side

2X50 25 balance drill with rotation, 9-6-3 kicks on each side / 25 swim

2X50 as 25 fingertip drag/ 25 swim

2X50 25 thumb-slide / 25 swim

MS: Focus on the aspect of the drill (balance and recovery phase) into the main set. If you are advanced and want to swim the set 1-4 times that is fine, keep effort 75% or T pace + 10 seconds

1-4 sets of (10x 50 swim) RI: 20 seconds

CD: 4X50 as 25 thumb slide / 25 fingertip drag

RI = rest interval

Keep track of pacing on the MS

T pace + 10 seconds if your T pace is 2:00 / 100 then T + 10 is 2:10 per 100 pace

 

DAY 5 – SWIM SKILLS AND DRILLS

WU: 100 swim

Drills: Focus on how well you do the drills, not on how fast.

2X50 25 balance drill left side/25 balance drill right side

2X50 25 balance drill with rotation, 9-6-3 kicks on each side / 25 swim

2X50 25 fist / 25 swim

2X50 25 HOOW (Head Out of Water) / 25 swim

MS: Focus on the aspect of the drill (balance and hand entry) into the main set. If you are advanced and want to swim the set 2-3 times that is fine, keep effort 75% T pace + 10 seconds

1-4 sets (10X50) RI: 20 seconds

CD: 100 easy choice

Keep Track of pacing

 

DAY 6 – Day Off: Focus on recovery today, nutrition, massage, stretch, yoga, relax.

 

DAY 7 – SWIM

WU: 100 swim

Drills: Focus on how well you do the drills, not on how fast.

2X100 25 balance drill/ 25 fingertip drag / 25 fist / 25 swim

2X100 25 balance drill with rotation/25 thumb slide/25 HOOW / 25 swim

MS: Focus on the aspect of the drill (recovery and hand entry) into the main set. If you are advanced and want to swim the set 2-4 times that is fine, keep effort 75%

1-4x (10X50s swim) RI: 20 seconds

CD: 4X50 odds drill of choice / evens swim

 

DAY 8 – SWIM SKILLS AND DRILLS

WU: 100 get loose

Drills: Focus on how well you do the drills, not on how fast.

2X50 25 double pump / 25 swim

2X50 25 one arm only one arm at your side / 25 swim

2X50 as 25 catch up drill / 25 swim

2X50 underwater doggie paddle / 25 swim

MS: Focus on the aspect of the drill (catch and pull) into the main set. If you are advanced and want to swim the set 2-3 times that is fine, keep effort 75%

50-100-150-200 RI: 20 seconds

CD: 4X50 as catch up / 25 underwater doggie paddle

RI = rest interval

Keep track of pacing on the MS

UWDP= Under Water Doggie Paddle

 

DAY 9 –  Day Off: Focus on recovery today, nutrition, massage, stretch, yoga, relax.

 

DAY 10 – SWIM SKILLS AND DRILLS

WU: 100 swim

Drills: Focus on how well you do the drills, not on how fast.

MS:

2X50 25 balance drill left side/25 balance drill right side

100 swim

2X50 25 balance drill with rotation, 9-6-3 kicks on each side / 25 swim

100 swim

2X50 25 fist / 25 swim

100 swim

2X50 25 HOOW / 25 swim

100 swim

2X50 25 double pump / 25 swim

100 swim

2X50 25 one arm only one arm at your side

100 swim

2X50 as 25 catch up drill / 25 swim

100

2X50 underwater doggie paddle / 25 swim

100 swim

CD: 100 swim

HOOW= Head out of Water Drill

 

DAY 11 – SWIM SKILLS AND DRILLS

WU: 200 swim

Drills: Focus on how well you do the drills, not on how fast.

Set #1 pick a balance drill #2 recovery drill set #3 hand entry drill set #4 pick and underwater pull drill

4x (4 x 50 25 drill / 25 swim focus on extending stroke from behind)

MS: Using the “feel” for the water you just developed:

2X (4X100) descend 1-4 (easy, medium, hard)

CD: 100 easy

Descend means start slow and each consecutive 100 is swim faster

 

DAY 12 –  Day Off: Focus on recovery today, nutrition, massage, stretch, yoga, relax.

 

DAY 13 – SWIM

WU: 100-200 get loose

Drills: Focus on how well you do the drills, not on how fast.

8X50 25 choice of drill / 25 swim

MS: 4X100 swim at T pace RI 15″

3X 100 pull with buoy at T pace RI 10”

2X 100 pull buoy and paddles RI 5’

100 swim

CD: 100 easy

Count your strokes during the swim and pull set to compare

 

DAY 14 –  SWIM

WU: 4 x 50 alternate 50 balance drill 50 balance w/rotation

4X50 alternate 50 double pump drill / 50 fist drill

4X50 alternate 50 one arm only / 50 swim

MS: focusing on balance, recovery and pull . extending stroke from behind, count strokes every 4th 25 for consistency.

4×200 aerobic effort T pace + 10 seconds RI 15″ alternate swim 200 with pull (buoy)

CD: 100 easy swim.

 

DAY 15 – SWIM

WU: 100 easy 6X 50 25 drill/25 swim

MS: Swim 40 x 50 RI 20″ strong effort while CONCENTRATING ON FORM ON EACH ONE! Focus on pulling to go faster not arm turnover

CD: 100

 

DAY 16 –  Day Off: Focus on recovery today, nutrition, massage, stretch, yoga, relax.

 

DAY 17 – SWIM

WU: 200 loosen up

3 x 100 done as 25 R. arm, 25 L. arm, 50 swim .

MS: 1000 continuous swim alternating T-pace 50s with T pace -5 second 50s

CD: 100 easy

If you T pace is 2:00 / 100 then swim 50 @ 1:00 with 50 @ 58.5 seconds

 

DAY 18 – SWIM

WU: 200 easy swimming.

Then 8×50 drill

2×50 double pump, 2×50 (Single arm drill), 2×50 underwater doggie paddle, 2×50 catch up

MS: Swim 2X (200 swim at T pace focused on extending stroke from behind then 6X50 odds FAST T pace -10 seconds / evens easy) RI 10″

CD: 100 non free

 

DAY 19 –  SWIM

WU:200 free, 3 x 100 done as 25 swim, 25 R arm only, 25 L arm only, 25 swim

MS: Try to make the times for these as consistent as possible. Short rest

2x (5 x 100 @ T pace RI 10″)

CD: 100 choice

 

DAY 20 –  Day Off: Focus on recovery today, nutrition, massage, stretch, yoga, relax.

 

DAY 21 –  SWIM

WU: 100 swim 4X 75 (25 balance with rotation / 25 double pump/25 UWDP)

MS: 5x (4 x 50 strongest sustainable effort with focused form) RI 20″

50 drill easy between each set

CD: 200

Very Fast is T pace – 10 seconds or faster

 

DAY 22 – SWIM

WU: 200 loosen up

MS: nice relaxed 1000 swim or pull focused on form

CD: 100

Today focus on relaxing and swimming with form focus, not speed. T + 10 pace

 

DAY 23 –  SWIM

WU: 6X100 odds swim evens mix of drills

MS:

50-100-150-200-200-150-100-50) at T pace -10 seconds RI 10″

CD: 200

Today you are building volume and increase in pace. T + 5 seconds so if you T pace is 2:00 / 100 pace then T – 5 is 1:55 and shorter rest so intensity will be higher.

 

DAY 24 –  Day Off: Focus on recovery today, nutrition, massage, stretch, yoga, relax.

 

 

DAY 25 – SWIM

WU: 600 loosen up as 4x (100 swim / 50 drill)

MS: continuous speed focused on form. If you need rest no more then RI 5″

25 fast/25 drill

50 fast/50 drill

75 fast/75 drill

100 fast/100 drill

150 fast/150 drill

100 fast/100 drill

75 fast/75 drill

50 fast/50 drill

25 fast/25 drill

CD: 200 nice and relaxed allow heart rate to fall.

Fast pace T pace – 10 seconds. So if your T pace is 2:00 T-10 is 1:50 pace

 

DAY 26 –  Day Off: Focus on recovery today, nutrition, massage, stretch, yoga, relax.

 

DAY 27 – SWIM

WU: 100 easy 8X50 25 drill / 25 swim

MS: Swim 40 x 25 RI 10″ strong effort while CONCENTRATING ON FORM ON EACH ONE!

CD: 100

 

DAY 28 –  Day Off: Focus on recovery today, nutrition, massage, stretch, yoga, relax.

 

 

DAY 29 – SWIM GOLF

Repeat swim Golf to compare stroke count from week 1 to stroke count now.

WU: 200 loosen up

MS: wear a pull buoy.

1. Swim 50 count strokes and add to your time, that is your golf score. Example, 50 strokes in 50 seconds = 100.

2. Then swim 50 with as many strokes as you can, Try to add at least 10 strokes per length. add to your time.

3. Then swim 50 with the least amount of strokes focusing on pulling from behind, past your hip, and add to your time.

Record your normal stroke count, FASTest stroke count, and stroke count when you are trying to take less strokes

MS: pull

10X50s best average golf score (stroke count and time). Did you lower your stroke count by taking less strokes or swimming faster or both?

CD: 100 easy

 

DAY 30 – FINAL SWIM TEST

Repeat test swim to compare to first week

WU: 200 warm up. 4 x 50 build RI 15 rest.

MS: 500 / 1000 yd TT (time trial) for time.

CD: 200 – This time is divided by 5 or 10 , to get your avg. pace. This pace is now known as your T-Pace.

WU = warm up

MS = main set

CD = cool down

Post Author: Dave Erickson