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This is a 12-part video coaching series and training plan for running a half marathon.  Whether you believe running is an art or a science, having an insight into how it affects the body can make those tough sessions seem a little more palatable.  Imagine you are just setting off for a run. Your heart rate (the number of times it beats per minute) and stroke volume (the amount of blood pumped out by your heart per beat) both increase, in order to feed the working muscles with lots of oxygen. Oxygen is transported in the blood – and the amount of oxygen-rich blood that flows out of the heart every minute is called your cardiac output (CO). An increased CO is one of the most important changes that will take place as a result of your training.

Why? Because being able to pump out more blood per minute means the heart doesn’t have to beat so many times as it once did in order to deliver the same amount of oxygen. That’s also why your resting heart rate drops as you get fitter. To put it in practical terms, if running a nine-minute mile took your heart rate up to 160bpm before, after a few weeks of regular training, that same pace might only elevate it to, say, 140bpm. You’ll only get your heart rate back up to 160bpm if you run faster. But the great thing is, it won’t feel any harder, as your fitness level has gone up a notch.

The oxygen-rich blood travels through a vast network of tiny capillaries, which are delicate enough to allow the exchange of gases, nutrients and waste products. Once it arrives at the muscles, they pick up the oxygen, offload some carbon dioxide and it makes its way back to the heart. But the muscle cells don’t take all the oxygen that the blood is carrying. In fact, your muscle cells’ capacity to extract oxygen from blood is one of the critical factors in your running performance. And the good news is that regular running actually increases your oxygen extraction capabilities, by triggering the growth of more capillaries in the muscle, creating a larger surface area for oxygen to be absorbed through. The average non-runner has 3-4 capillaries per muscle fiber while a well-trained runner might have 5-7 per fiber.

The maximum rate at which oxygen can be extracted from the air and used by the muscle is that mysterious Vo2 max you often hear runners talk about. It is partly determined by your sex (women have a lower Vo2 max than men at all levels) genetics and age, but it will almost certainly increase as you get into the swing of regular running. As a general example, a sedentary woman may have a Vo2 max of 35 ml/kg/min while a highly trained man may be closer to 60 ml/kg/min.

But what’s the big deal about all this oxygen, anyway? Well, when enough oxygen is flowing through the bloodstream to meet energy needs, the ‘powerhouses’ of the muscle cells, (the mitochondria), are able to use it to produce energy from the breakdown of a special substance called adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Since the body can only store enough ATP to last for approximately two seconds, it has to be continually broken down in order to sustain any form of activity. But when there isn’t enough oxygen coming through to meet demand, the muscle cells have to make ATP without oxygen, or anaerobically.

This is far less efficient when it comes to an endurance activity such as running, as it results in the accumulation of lactic acid in the muscles. The lactic acid is removed, but if it is produced at a faster rate than it can be taken away, you cross what is known as the ‘lactate threshold’. Physiologically, the lactate threshold is the last point at which lactate is being removed as fast as it is being produced. It’s that feeling when your legs are like concrete, your stomach is churning and your inner voice is screaming ‘STOP!’

Although this point is reached all too soon when you’re a novice runner, your aerobic capacity will soon improve, pushing up the threshold point (closer to your Vo2 max) and allowing you to work at higher intensities without it feeling so tough, and without the negative effects of anaerobic metabolism interfering with your performance.

A number of factors play a part in this change. Firstly, as you become fitter, the number and size of mitochondria increases to cope with the higher demand for energy production.  Like any muscle, the heart – when faced with all that extra work – gets stronger (the left side of the heart, which pumps blood out, can actually get bigger) – and believe it or not, the amount of blood in your body also increases, particularly the volume of red blood cells, which act as the oxygen ‘courier’.

Another bonus of regular aerobic training is that it teaches the body to use fat as its energy source, instead of carbohydrate. Sounds good? It is, and not just because utilizing fat means you’ll have less of it clinging to your thighs and tummy (not to mention your heart) but also because it allows precious glycogen, the body’s stored form of carbohydrate, to be ‘spared’ or saved. Since we can only store a limited amount of glycogen in the body, it’s a good thing to hang on to it where possible, and use fat, which is usually available in unlimited supply! Incidentally, as you improve as a runner, the amount of glycogen you can store will also increase substantially.

So there you have it. I think you’ll agree that you don’t need to be a scientist to appreciate the host of positive changes that take place when you become a real runner.

10 PRINCIPLES OF MARATHON RUNNING

A marathon training program can survive any challenge — as long as your determination remains strong. Here are 10 principles to carry you through your training.

1. Alternate hard days with easy days

If you need to adjust the training schedule because of travel, time conflicts at home or work, or weather problems, remember to follow an easy day/hard day pattern. (Run easy today, hard tomorrow, easy the next day, hard the day after, etc.) Don’t run hard two days consecutively to compensate for lost training. And be sure to view Long Slow Distance (“LSD”), as well as any speedwork, as a hard day – and thus never do speedwork and a long run on successive days.

2. Ain’t no mountain high enough

Regular runs on hilly terrain are an important component in building strength and stamina. If hills are available where you live, make sure to include them in your running routes – especially if your marathon has hills.

3. Don’t skimp on the sleep

Don’t skimp on sleep during your marathon build-up. Consistent quality sleep (7 hours minimum a night for most people) is vital to recovery from the wear-and-tear of workouts.

4. If you’re hurting, take it easy

Don’t run with an injury. If you sense the onset of one, rest or cross train for 1-3 days to see if the injury symptoms subside. If they do, resume gentle running. If they don’t, seek professional medical opinion as to the nature of your injury and continue to lay off of running until cleared to resume by the professional.

5. Step lively

Never train in broken-down shoes. Quality running shoes last for a maximum of 500 miles or less before their support systems break down. Carefully gauge the condition of your shoes against the number of miles you’ve run in them. When you begin to feel regular flare ups of knee, shin, foot, or hip discomfort, it’s probably time for new shoes. Continuing to run in broken-down shoes often results in injuries.

6. Shop Wisely

The best place to shop for shoes (and running clothing and accessories) is a retail store that specializes in running shoes – not soccer cleats, basketball shoes, or pro team jerseys. In a specialty running store you will be waited on by runners (no doubt more experienced than you) who’ve been trained in running mechanics and schooled in running-shoe technologies. They’ll guide through the maze of choices to shoes that are most compatible with your running mechanics and training practices.

7. Follow the path

Follow our marathon training schedules as best you can. They work, but listen to your body and be smart and flexible in making training decisions. If you’re exhausted, skip your scheduled 7 A.M. Sunday 20-miler and sleep in; do the long run another time. If you’re running track repeats at 5 P.M. and it’s 95 degrees, wait for a cooler day to do this workout.

8. Get Social

Marathon training can be either a solitary or social experience; we recommend making it social. Why? Training with a compatible partner, or as part of a group of runners with compatible goals, can provide support, motivation, humor, structure, information exchange, and sometimes professional coaching.

9. Dress accordingly

Keep abreast of local weather forecasts and dress for running accordingly. Generally, wear less clothing than you think you’ll need for the expected temperatures. The body generates plenty of heat during running, and by overdressing, you significantly increase your risk for dehydration and may inhibit your body’s natural cooling abilities.

10. Eat to perform

Gone are the days when marathoners wouldn’t drink or eat during training runs. Now it’s essential that you plan to drink water or sports drinks for runs exceeding an hour, and plan to eat (energy bars, energy gels, fruit, bagels, or sugary snacks) during training runs 90 minutes or longer. Just as important is to be well-hydrated and fed before you start any run. Of course, you’ll also want to keep well-fueled during your marathon itself. The bottom line on hydration and eating: Find out through experimentation what quantity and mix of beverages and foods works best for you during longer training runs, then follow through with it during your marathon.

 

MARATHON TRAINING CHEAT SHEET: Training for a half or full marathon takes diligence, commitment, endurance — and math skills! If you want to compete in marathons, you need to be able to interpret posted running times, figure out how fast your pace is, and determine the length of the races you want to run. And that’s on top of counting reps during circuit training!

INTERPRETING RUNNING TIMES FOR MARATHON TRAINING: When you’re training for a marathon, time takes on a whole new dimension — and vocabulary. From mile splits (the time you run for each mile of a marathon) to finish times (your overall time for a race) to the speed displayed on your treadmill, marathoners are faced with all sorts of numbers. Read on to see what they mean.

READING AROUND THE COLONS: When you see 4:02:27, 8:31, or :80, what does it all mean?

  • Any number with two colons is giving you hours, then minutes, then seconds. So 4:02:27 means 4 hours, 2 minutes, and 27 seconds.
  • When you see one colon, the time is in minutes and seconds. So 8:31 means 8 minutes and 31 seconds.
  • Times that are over — but close to — a minute or an hour may be converted to hours or minutes or may not. So you may see 80 seconds as :80 or as 1:20 (1 minute, 20 seconds). If you run a 10K in 65:00 (65 minutes), it may also be written as 1:05:00 (1 hour, 5 minutes).

FIGURING YOUR AVERAGE TIME: To calculate minutes per mile when you’re running one of your measured road routes, use a calculator and do the following:

Round your seconds to minutes and your hours to minutes, too.

  • For example, 36:33 (36 minutes and 33 seconds) becomes 37 minutes, and 1:10:24 — that’s 1 hour, 10 minutes, and 24 seconds — becomes 70 minutes.
  • Divide the minutes by the number of miles.
  • Subtract the minutes, so that you’re left with just the decimal that represents the number of seconds. Then multiply that decimal by 60.
  • For example, if after you divide your minutes by miles, you’re left with 9.27, subtract 9 and multiply .27 by 60 to get 16.2 and round it down to 16.
  • Put the number of seconds back with the minutes, and you have your pace.
  • Using the previous example, you end up with 9 minutes + 16 seconds = 9:16 minutes per mile

TRANSLATING MARATHON AND OTHER RACE LENGTHS: Training for a marathon means training to run 26.2 miles. You may want to run other races, as well, many of which measured in kilometers. Read on to see what all those lengths mean in miles and kilometers:

  • *Marathon: 26.2 miles
  • *30K: 18.6 miles
  • *25K: 15.5 miles
  • *Half-marathon: 13.1 miles
  • *20K: 12.4 miles
  • *15K: 9.3 miles
  • *10K (or 10,000 meters): 6.2 miles
  • *5K (or 5,000 meters): 3.1 miles
  • *1,600 meters: 1 mile (4 times around a track)
  • *1,500 meters: .93 miles (3 3/4 times around a track)
  • *800 meters: 1/2 mile (2 times around a track)
  • *400 meters: 1/4 mile (1 time around a track)
  • *200 meters: 1/8 mile (1/2 time around a track)

CONVERTING MILES PER HOUR TO MINUTES PER MILE: If you use a treadmill as part of your marathon training, you may need a formula to convert miles per hour to minutes per mile.

Follow these steps to see how:

  • Divide 60 by whatever miles per hour the treadmill displays.
  • For example, if the treadmill says you’re running 7.1 miles per hour, divide 60 by 7.1, and you get 8.45 (almost 9 minutes).
  • Subtract the minutes so that you’re left with just the decimal that represents the number of seconds, and then multiply that decimal amount by 60.
  • Subtract 8 and multiply .45 by 60 to get 27.
  • Add that number back to the minutes, and you have your pace.
  • 8 minutes + 27 seconds = 8:27 minutes per mile.
12 Weeks Out – Half Marathon Training Made Easy

Training Week Preview Video

MONDAY:  Rest Day (Click on the “Training Week Preview Video” link above)

TUESDAY:  Run Test (1.5-3-Mile Time Trial):

• Do this test on a track or other measured course

• Warm up by running for 10 minutes starting easy and gradually increasing your speed. End where you will start your time trial.

• Clear your watch and heart-rate monitor (as applicable to you) and run three miles as fast as you can. To do this well, you need to really keep your pacing even and not go too hard/fast too soon. Again, you want to cover the three miles as quickly as possible, not go real fast and then slow down. Note: If your heart-rate monitor does not measure average heart rate, note your heart rate with one mile to go, with1/2 mile to go, and at the completion of your time trial.

• Walk 10 minutes very easy to cool-down.

• Later on, calculate your average pace by converting your time to Minutes: seconds per mile.

• Later on, calculate your average heart rate, if necessary, by averaging the three heart rates you noted.

• Your can input your pace and heart rate into training peaks to calcite your heart rate and pace zones.

• Or goto this link and calculate your heart rate training zones.

Additional Resources:

A Better Warm Up

3 Drills to Improve Running Mechanics and Speed

TUESDAY Continued: Core Strength Training

WU: 5-10 minutes then complete 2 sets of 15-20 reps or 30-60 seconds

-Stability ball wall sits with medicine ball between your legs

-Push up knee tuck with stability ball

-Bosu ball squat press

-Stability ball Ts and Ys.

-Stability ball leg curl

-Row machine or dumbbells

-Tricep dills

-Crunches on stability ball with medicine ball

-Lower back extension

-Flutter kicks

-Crunches knee to elbow

-Bicycles

-Reverse crunch

WEDNESDAY:  Rest Day or Cross Train

THURSDAY: Run 20-40 minutes zone 1-3

WU: 5-10 minute zone 1-2 include drills from Tuesday and dynamic stretch

MS: Run 15-25 minutes. zone 2. During your run add 6X30 second accelerations at any 6 points you are ready to pick up your pace. Ok to walk for recovery. The goal is to increase your leg turnover. so count your cadence, aim for 20-23 one foot strikes in 30 seconds

CD: 5-10 minute walk/jog then static stretch

THURSDAY Continued: Core Strength Training

WU: 5-10 minutes then complete 2 sets of 15-20 reps or 30-60 seconds

-Stability ball wall sits with medicine ball between your legs

-Push up knee tuck with stability ball

-Bosu ball squat press

-Stability ball Ts and Ys.

-Stability ball leg curl

-Row machine or dumbbells

-Tricep dills

-Crunches on stability ball with medicine ball

-Lower back extension

-Flutter kicks

-Crunches knee to elbow

-Bicycles

-Reverse crunch

FRIDAY:  Rest Day or Cross Train

SATURDAY:  Run 6 miles zone 1-2 pace or heart rate

The longer runs are key to your half marathon performance. They build aerobic development, strength and endurance necessary for completing your half marathon. It is best if these runs on terrain that your event will be run on.  The intensity of these runs should be easy to moderate, as the objective is to improving your aerobic capacity.

SUNDAY:  Today you have the option of resting or running easy 30 minutes zone 1-2.

 

11 Weeks Out – Half Marathon Training Made Easy

Training Week Preview Video

MONDAY:  Rest Day (Click on the “Training Week Preview Video” link above)

TUESDAY:  Run Progression

WU: 5-10 minutes zone 1-2 include drills (see below)

MS: Run 2 miles and progressively increase your pace each 1/2 mile based on how you feel. Start zone 2 and finish zone 3-4 Focus on 85-90 one foot strikes / minute all all paces

CD: 5-10 minutes

Additional Resources:

WU: Review links below then do the following drills during a 10 minute warmup, 4X30″ of each:

1. Lean Forward

2. Foot Placement

TUESDAY Continued: Core Strength Training

WU: 5-10 minutes then complete 2 sets of 15-20 reps or 30-60 seconds

-Stability ball wall sits with medicine ball between your legs

-Push up knee tuck with stability ball

-Bosu ball squat press

-Stability ball Ts and Ys.

-Stability ball leg curl

-Row machine or dumbbells

-Tricep dills

-Crunches on stability ball with medicine ball

-Lower back extension

-Flutter kicks

-Crunches knee to elbow

-Bicycles

-Reverse crunch

WEDNESDAY:  Rest Day or Cross Train

THURSDAY: Run 25-45 minutes zone 1-3

WU: 10 minute include drills from Tuesday and dynamic stretch.

MS: Run 15-25 minutes. During your run add 6X30 second accelerations at any 6 points you are ready to pick up your pace. It’s ok to walk for recovery. The goal is to increase your leg turnover so count your cadence.

CD: 5-10 minute walk/jog then static stretch

THURSDAY Continued: Core Strength Training

WU: 5-10 minutes then complete 2 sets of 15-20 reps or 30-60 seconds

-Stability ball wall sits with medicine ball between your legs

-Push up knee tuck with stability ball

-Bosu ball squat press

-Stability ball Ts and Ys.

-Stability ball leg curl

-Row machine or dumbbells

-Tricep dills

-Crunches on stability ball with medicine ball

-Lower back extension

-Flutter kicks

-Crunches knee to elbow

-Bicycles

-Reverse crunch

FRIDAY:  Rest Day or Cross Train

SATURDAY:  Run 6 miles zone 1-2 pace or heart rate

The longer runs are key to your half marathon performance. They build aerobic development, strength and endurance necessary for completing your half marathon. It is best if these runs on terrain that your event will be run on.  The intensity of these runs should be easy to moderate, as the objective is to improving your aerobic capacity.

SUNDAY:  Today you have the option of resting or running easy 30 minutes zone 1-2.

 

10 Weeks Out – Half Marathon Training Made Easy

Training Week Preview Video

MONDAY:  Rest Day (Click on the “Training Week Preview Video” link above)

TUESDAY:  WU: 5-10 minutes zone 1-2 include drills

MS: Run 3 miles and progressively increase your pace each mile based on how you feel. Start zone 2 and finish zone 3-4 Focus on 85-90 one foot strikes / minute all all paces

CD: 5-10 minutes

Additional Resources:

WU: Review links below then do the following drills during a 10 minute warmup, 4X30″ of each:

1. Lean Forward

2. Foot Placement

TUESDAY Continued: Core Strength Training

WU: 5-10 minutes then complete 2 sets of 15-20 reps or 30-60 seconds

-Stability ball wall sits with medicine ball between your legs

-Push up knee tuck with stability ball

-Bosu ball squat press

-Stability ball Ts and Ys.

-Stability ball leg curl

-Row machine or dumbbells

-Tricep dills

-Crunches on stability ball with medicine ball

-Lower back extension

-Flutter kicks

-Crunches knee to elbow

-Bicycles

-Reverse crunch

WEDNESDAY:  Rest Day or Cross Train

THURSDAY: Run 25-45 minutes zone 1-3

WU: 10 minute include drills from Tuesday and dynamic stretch

MS: Run 15-25 minutes. During your run add 6X30 second accelerations at any 6 points you are ready to pick up your pace. Ok to walk for recovery. The goal is to increase your leg turnover so count your cadence.

CD: 5-10 minute walk/jog then static stretch

THURSDAY Continued: Core Strength Training

WU: 5-10 minutes then complete 2 sets of 15-20 reps or 30-60 seconds

-Stability ball wall sits with medicine ball between your legs

-Push up knee tuck with stability ball

-Bosu ball squat press

-Stability ball Ts and Ys.

-Stability ball leg curl

-Row machine or dumbbells

-Tricep dills

-Crunches on stability ball with medicine ball

-Lower back extension

-Flutter kicks

-Crunches knee to elbow

-Bicycles

-Reverse crunch

FRIDAY:  Rest Day or Cross Train

SATURDAY:  Run 7 miles zone 1-2 pace or heart rate

SUNDAY:  Today you have the option of resting or running easy 30 minutes zone 1-2.

 

9 Weeks Out (Rest Week) – Half Marathon Training Made Easy

Training Week Preview Video

MONDAY:  Rest Day (Click on the “Training Week Preview Video” link above)

TUESDAY:  Run easy 30 minutes zone 1-2

WEDNESDAY:  Rest Day or Cross Train

THURSDAY: Run easy 30 minutes zone 1-2

FRIDAY:  Rest Day or Cross Train

SATURDAY:  Run 4-5 miles zone 1-2

SUNDAY:  Today you have the option of resting or running easy 30 minutes zone 1-2.

 

8 Weeks Out – Half Marathon Training Made Easy

Training Week Preview Video

MONDAY:  Rest Day (Click on the “Training Week Preview Video” link above)

TUESDAY:  Track Day

WU: 10 minutes get your blood flowing

MS: Short/ speed/form workout 8×200/walk 100 recovery

CD: 10 minute walk jog focused on form

Think about bringing your heel up to your butt, and a lean forward. Focus on quick leg turnover during your 200s.

Pick 3 drills to do 4X 30″ each

These should help you:

Butt kicks: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i11d9P9MAms

Injury: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IN7YSKvf1Bk

Cadence: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wEzZ4GNKq9E

Forward lean:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XFfMMtmJDv4

Relaxed ankles:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RwApG9i6Nac

Foot placement:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BlKKWoNyBmQ

Hips:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mSvbS0S4rJw

Overstriding:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ez4CbxdPwvg

Skipping drill: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=boMAV2V56Oo

TUESDAY Continued: Stability and Endurance

The following movements can be found www.coreperformance.com

Goals: Controlled motions; focus on technique

WU: 5 minute cardio of choice

DYNAMIC STRETCH

-Elbow and knee lunge

-Arm swings

-Inch worms

-Walking hip cradle ACTIVATION

-Plank

-Double leg bridge

-Single leg bridge Lateral hip circuit

MS:

-Romanian deadlift Step up

-Lat pull down

-Dumbbell bench press

-I/Y/T/W shoulder series

-Clam shell series

-Stability ball rollout

-Side plank

-Bird dog

CD: foam roller

WEDNESDAY:  Rest Day or Cross Train

THURSDAY: Hills

WU: Run easy for 10 minutes in zone 1-2

MS: Mix of uphill and downhill accelerations zone 3-4.

Best if done on grass, golf course or in a park. Do 4x accelerating sprints down a gentle grade of 100-150 meters.  Let gravity help, don’t land heel to stop yourself. Walk up for recovery then repeat 4 more focused on uphill, walk downhill

CD: 10 minutes zone 2 while maintaining quick leg turnover, 85-90 one foot strikes / minute

THURSDAY Continued: Stability and Endurance

The following movements can be found www.coreperformance.com

Goals: Controlled motions; focus on technique

WU: 5 minute cardio of choice

DYNAMIC STRETCH

-Elbow and knee lunge

-Arm swings

-Inch worms

-Walking hip cradle ACTIVATION

-Plank

-Double leg bridge

-Single leg bridge Lateral hip circuit

MS:

-Romanian deadlift Step up

-Lat pull down

-Dumbbell bench press

-I/Y/T/W shoulder series

-Clam shell series

– Stability ball rollout

-Side plank

-Bird dog

CD: foam roller

FRIDAY:  Rest Day or Cross Train

SATURDAY:  Run 7 miles

WU: 2 miles zone 1-2

MS: Run 4 miles as 2x (1 mile zone 2 then 1 mile zone 3)

CD: 1 mile zone 1

SUNDAY:  Today you have the option of resting or running easy 30 minutes zone 1-2.

 

7 Weeks Out – Half Marathon Training Made Easy

Training Week Preview Video

MONDAY:  Rest Day (Click on the “Training Week Preview Video” link above)

TUESDAY:  Track

WU: 10 minutes get your blood flowing

MS: Short/ speed/form workout 4×400 walk 200 recovery

CD: 10 minute walk jog focused on form

*Pick 3 drills to do 4X 30″ each

These should help you:

Butt kicks: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i11d9P9MAms

Injury: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IN7YSKvf1Bk

Cadence: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wEzZ4GNKq9E

Forward lean:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XFfMMtmJDv4

Relaxed ankles:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RwApG9i6Nac

Foot placement:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BlKKWoNyBmQ

Hips:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mSvbS0S4rJw

Overstriding:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ez4CbxdPwvg

TUESDAY Continued: Maximum Strength

WU : 5 minute jog then:

DYNAMIC STRETCH

Elbow and knee lunge X 10

Walking hip cradle X 10

Lateral lunges X 10 each side

Plank hold as long as your can

Single leg curl on stability ball

MS:

4X 6- reps RI 1 minute between sets

Split squat

Romanian deadlift

Lat pull down

Dumbbell bench press

2X 15 I/Y/T/W shoulder series

2x 30 each side Clam shell

CORE

Stability ball rollout

Side plank with leg lift

CD: Static stretches / foam roll

WEDNESDAY:  Rest Day or Cross Train

THURSDAY: Hills

WU: Run easy for 10 minutes in zone 1-2

MS: Mix of uphill and downhill accelerations zone 3-4.

Best if done on grass, golf course or in a park. Do 4x accelerating sprints down a gentle grade of 100-150 meters.  Let gravity help, don’t land heel to stop yourself. Walk up for recovery then repeat 4 more focused on uphill, walk downhill

CD: 10 minutes zone 2 while maintaining quick leg turnover, 85-90 one foot strikes / minute

THURSDAY Continued: Maximum Strength

WU : 5 minute jog then:

DYNAMIC STRETCH

Elbow and knee lunge X 10

Walking hip cradle X 10

Lateral lunges X 10 each side

Plank hold as long as your can

Single leg curl on stability ball

MS:

4X 6- reps RI 1 minute between sets

Split squat

Romanian deadlift

Lat pull down

Dumbbell bench press

2X 15 I/Y/T/W shoulder series

2x 30 each side Clam shell

CORE

Stability ball rollout

Side plank with leg lift

CD: Static stretches / foam roll

FRIDAY:  Rest Day or Cross Train

SATURDAY:  Run 8 miles

WU: 1 miles zone 1-2

MS: Run 6 miles as 2 mile zone 2. then 1 mile zone 3

CD: 1 mile zone 1

SUNDAY:  Today you have the option of resting or running easy 30 minutes zone 1-2.

 

6 Weeks Out – Half Marathon Training Made Easy

Training Week Preview Video

MONDAY:  Rest Day (Click on the “Training Week Preview Video” link above)

TUESDAY:  Track Day

WU: 10 minutes get your blood flowing

MS: Short/ speed/form workout 4X 200 walk 100 recovery, then 2X 400, walk 100 recovery

CD: 10 minute walk jog focused on form

*Pick 3 drills to do 4X 30″ each

These should help you:

Butt kicks: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i11d9P9MAms

Injury: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IN7YSKvf1Bk

Cadence: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wEzZ4GNKq9E

Forward lean:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XFfMMtmJDv4

Relaxed ankles:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RwApG9i6Nac

Foot placement:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BlKKWoNyBmQ

Hips:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mSvbS0S4rJw

Overstriding:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ez4CbxdPwvg

Skipping drill: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=boMAV2V56Oo

WEDNESDAY:  Rest Day or Cross Train

THURSDAY:  Hills

WU: Run easy 10 minutes zone 1-2

MS: Run to a hill that will take 2 minutes to climb. Run 5X 2 minute uphill, recovery is downhill.

CD: 10 minutes easy while maintaining quick leg turnover, 85-90 one foot strikes / minute

FRIDAY:  Rest Day or Cross Train

SATURDAY:  Run 10 miles zone 1-2

WU: 2 miles zone 1

MS: run 6 miles zone 2

CD: 2 miles zone 1

SUNDAY:  Today you have the option of resting or running easy 30 minutes zone 1-2.

 

5 Weeks Out (Rest Week) – Half Marathon Training Made Easy

Training Week Preview Video

MONDAY:  Rest Day (Click on the “Training Week Preview Video” link above)

TUESDAY:  Run easy 30 minutes zone 1-2.

TUESDAY Continued: Maximum Strength

WU : 5 minute jog then:

DYNAMIC STRETCH

Elbow and knee lunge X 10

Walking hip cradle X 10

Lateral lunges X 10 each side

Plank hold as long as your can

Single leg curl on stability ball

MS:

4X 6- reps RI 1 minute between sets

Split squat

Romanian deadlift

Lat pull down

Dumbbell bench press

2X 15 I/Y/T/W shoulder series

2x 30 each side Clam shell

CORE

Stability ball rollout

Side plank with leg lift

CD: Static stretches / foam roll

WEDNESDAY:  Rest Day or Cross Train

THURSDAY: Run easy 30 minutes zone 1-2.

THURSDAY Continued: Maximum Strength

WU : 5 minute jog then:

DYNAMIC STRETCH

Elbow and knee lunge X 10

Walking hip cradle X 10

Lateral lunges X 10 each side

Plank hold as long as your can

Single leg curl on stability ball

MS:

4X 6- reps RI 1 minute between sets

Split squat

Romanian deadlift

Lat pull down

Dumbbell bench press

2X 15 I/Y/T/W shoulder series

2x 30 each side Clam shell

CORE

Stability ball rollout

Side plank with leg lift

CD: Static stretches / foam roll

FRIDAY:  Rest Day or Cross Train

SATURDAY:  Run Test / 10k

SUNDAY:  Today you have the option of resting or running easy 30 minutes zone 1-2

 

4 Weeks Out – Half Marathon Training Made Easy

Training Week Preview Video

MONDAY:  Rest Day (Click on the “Training Week Preview Video” link above)

TUESDAY:  Tempo Run

Run 3-5 miles include a 1-2 mile run at your zone 3-4 pace/heart rate.

WU: 10-15 minutes zone 1-2

MS: Run 4X 5 minutes, at zone 3-4, RI 2′

CD: 5-10 minutes zone 1-2

Tempo sessions are an important part of the training program for half marathons. These sessions should be run just under your anaerobic threshold intensity, 85-90% effort, zone 3, low zone 4.

Drills: http://t2coaching.com/run/focus-on-run-bike-technique-too/

4×30 to 60 seconds of butt kicks, high knees, bounding, superman.

After drills, do some dynamic stretching including the movements from the following link:

http://www.coreperformance.com/knowledge/workouts/a-better-warm-up.html

After stretching include 4x 20 second accelerations.

TUESDAY Continued: Maximum Strength

WU : 5 minute jog then:

DYNAMIC STRETCH

Elbow and knee lunge X 10

Walking hip cradle X 10

Lateral lunges X 10 each side

Plank hold as long as your can

Single leg curl on stability ball

MS:

4X 6- reps RI 1 minute between sets

Split squat

Romanian deadlift

Lat pull down

Dumbbell bench press

2X 15 I/Y/T/W shoulder series

2x 30 each side Clam shell

CORE

Stability ball rollout

Side plank with leg lift

CD: Static stretches / foam roll

WEDNESDAY:  Rest Day or Cross Train

THURSDAY: Hills

WU: 10 min zone 1-2.

Find a hill that will take you at least 2 minutes to climb.  Add 4 x strides about 20″ each within your warm up.

MS: Hill: 8X 2:00 work uphill zone 3-4 on odds numbers and work downhill on even numbers

CD: 10 min easy

THURSDAY Continued: Maximum Strength

WU : 5 minute jog then:

DYNAMIC STRETCH

Elbow and knee lunge X 10

Walking hip cradle X 10

Lateral lunges X 10 each side

Plank hold as long as your can

Single leg curl on stability ball

MS:

4X 6- reps RI 1 minute between sets

Split squat

Romanian deadlift

Lat pull down

Dumbbell bench press

2X 15 I/Y/T/W shoulder series

2x 30 each side Clam shell

CORE

Stability ball rollout

Side plank with leg lift

CD: Static stretches / foam roll

FRIDAY:  Rest Day or Cross Train

SATURDAY:  Run 10 miles

First 5 miles zone 1-2

Second 5 miles zone 3

SUNDAY:  Today you have the option of resting or running easy 30 minutes zone 1-2

 

3 Weeks Out – Half Marathon Training Made Easy

Training Week Preview Video

MONDAY:  Rest Day (Click on the “Training Week Preview Video” link above)

TUESDAY:  Tempo Run

WU: 10 minutes then drills

MS: 3x 1 mile @ zone 3-4 focus on 85-90 one foot strikes / minute walk or jog 3 minutes between each mile

CD: 1/2 mile easy zone 1

Focus on your breathing and running relaxed and strong as a pace you can sustain for the mile, consider building each mile too.

TUESDAY Continued: Strength Maintenance:

WU: 5 minutes

DYNAMIC STRETCH

ACTIVATION

-plank 3X60 seconds side/front/side

-Glute 3x 10 bridge double leg/single/single

POWER

-Squat jumps on bench 3X30 seconds

-Medicine ball slams

RESISTANCE

3 SETS 12-10-8 70-85%

-Split squat

-Romanian deadlift

-Lat pull down OR pull- up or row

-Dumbbell bench press or push ups

AUXILIARY

3x 10

-I/Y/T/W shoulder series

– Clam shell series

CORE

-Front plank alternating leg lift

-Side plank with leg lift

-superman

COOL-DOWN

Static stretches

WEDNESDAY:  Rest Day or Cross Train

THURSDAY: Hills

WU: 10 minutes ending at a hill that will take you at least 2 minutes to climb

Then run 4X60″ uphill.  Try to go a little farther up the hill each time. RI is your jog down.

Then run 5 minutes zone 3

CD: 10 minute jog back to starting point

FRIDAY:  Rest Day or Cross Train

SATURDAY:  Run 12 miles zone 2-3

WU: 2 mile zone 1-2

MS: Run 9 miles zone 2-3

CD: CD: 1 mile zone 1-2

SUNDAY:  Today you have the option of resting or running easy 30 minutes zone 1-2.

 

2 Weeks Out – Half Marathon Training Made Easy

Training Week Preview Video

MONDAY:  Rest Day (Click on the “Training Week Preview Video” link above)

TUESDAY:  Tempo Run

WU: 15 minutes zone 1-2 include drills

MS: Run 4-6-8 minutes @ zone 3-4 RI 2′ between each

CD: 10 minutes zone 1-2

Remember, tempo sessions are an important part of the training program for half marathons. These sessions should be run just under your anaerobic threshold intensity, 85-90% effort, zone 3, low zone 4.

Drills: http://t2coaching.com/run/focus-on-run-bike-technique-too/

4×30 to 60 seconds of butt kicks, high knees, bounding, superman.

After drills, do some dynamic stretching including the movements from the following link:

http://www.coreperformance.com/knowledge/workouts/a-better-warm-up.html

After stretching include 4x 20 second accelerations.

TUESDAY Continued: Strength Maintenance:

WU: 5 minutes

DYNAMIC STRETCH

ACTIVATION

-plank 3X60 seconds side/front/side

-Glute 3x 10 bridge double leg/single/single

POWER

-Squat jumps on bench 3X30 seconds

-Medicine ball slams

RESISTANCE

3 SETS 12-10-8 70-85%

-Split squat

-Romanian deadlift

-Lat pull down OR pull- up or row

-Dumbbell bench press or push ups

AUXILIARY

3x 10

-I/Y/T/W shoulder series

– Clam shell series

CORE

-Front plank alternating leg lift

-Side plank with leg lift

-superman

COOL-DOWN

Static stretches

WEDNESDAY:  Rest Day or Cross Train

THURSDAY: Hills

Run 45-60 minute over a hilly course zone 2-4

FRIDAY:  Rest Day or Cross Train

SATURDAY:  

WU: 1 mile zone 1-2

MS: Run 4 miles zone 3

CD: 1 mile zone 1-2

SUNDAY:  Today you have the option of resting or running easy 30 minutes zone 1-2.

 

Race Week – Half Marathon Training Made Easy

Training Week Preview Video

MONDAY:  Rest Day (Click on the “Training Week Preview Video” link above)

TUESDAY:  

WU: 10 minute easy then drills: http://t2coaching.com/run/focus-on-run-bike-technique-too/

4×30 to 60 seconds of butt kicks, high knees, bounding, superman.

After drills:  Dynamic Stretching including the movements from the following link:

http://www.coreperformance.com/knowledge/workouts/a-better-warm-up.html

After stretching include 4x 20 second accelerations

MS: 4X400 comfortably fast, focus on form, RPE 8, RI 200 easy jog

CD: 5-10 minute jog

WEDNESDAY:  Rest Day or Cross Train

THURSDAY: Run easy 20 minutes zone 1-2.

FRIDAY:  Rest Day or Cross Train

SATURDAY:  Run easy 20 minutes zone 1-2.

SUNDAY:  RACE DAY!  Trust your training and your coach and most importantly, have FUN!

F.A.Q: How long should my recovery be after the half marathon?

Answer: Every runner recovers at different rates. This is largely dependent on experience and fitness starting the program. Generally allow about a day for each mile run, so 13 miles is about 2 weeks. This recovery period should initially involve some days off and light walking, swimming or cycling. This activity will enhance your recovery. Towards the end of this period you may start doing some very low intensity short jogs. It is very important to use your judgement, based on how you feel, to determine when to fully restart run training. – COACH WENDY

 

10 BONUS VIDEOS

How to Warmup for a Run

Speed Work

Major Cause of Muscle Cramps and Prevention Tips

Cross Training for Marathon Training

Aqua Jogging 101

Why Athletes Should Keep a Training Log

Heart Rate Run Training

5 Signs of Overtraining

Marathon Race Week Prep

Post Marathon Depression

 

#AskCoachWendy Interview Segments

Tips on How to Improve Your Swimming

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How to Master Open Water Swimming

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How to Bike More Efficiently

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How to Fuel on the Bike & Master Aid Stations

(Watch Video Here)

How to Save Time in Transition

(Watch Video Here)

Key Components of a Triathlon Race Plan

(Watch Video Here)

Food to Avoid During Training or Racing

(Watch Video Here)

S.M.A.R.T. Training Goals

(Watch Video Here)

Off-Season Triathlon Training Ideas

(Watch Video Here)

Balance and Flexibility Exercises for Triathletes

(Watch Video Here)

 

Post Author: Dave Erickson